by Amanda Brauer


one step back
We all know we should use these “low energy” light bulbs, even if they look a little funny, we use them because we love the earth. We’ve heard the hype (direct from the ge website):
• Save $36-$59 on energy bills over the life of the bulb
• Last 8-10 times longer than standard bulbs
and most appealing to the green of heart…
• Use up to 75% less energy – and using less energy means less pollution is generated

So why on earth is it so overly wrapped in this crazy thick plastic??? When basically every piece of plastic ever created still exists…do we need our “green” products slathered with the stuff?

Get involved…there is a form letter in the comment section to this post — cut and paste, email away, and let them know you care!

**it’s also worth noting a new bill has passed in Congress relating to the use of these lightbulbs. Below is a Republican Congressman railing against the bill. I hate to admit that much of what he says does unveil the silliness by which our legislators are approaching very serious issues. You Decide!

Average Rating: 5 out of 5 based on 164 user reviews.



by Kimberly B.

In a bid to become more eco-friendly, last March, Ikea’s U.S. division started to charge 5 cents per bag for going plastic. The alternative for customers was to either bring in their own bags or buy $0.59 reusable ones from Ikea.

After one year, the company reports that the response was exceptional. Ikea’s initial goal was to reduce usage in their stores from 70 million to 35 million bags per year. They got that and more: Plastic bag consumpiton dropped a whopping 92 percent, meaning roughly 64 million less bags were used.

read (portfolio.com)

Average Rating: 4.8 out of 5 based on 240 user reviews.



by Amanda Brauer

In Fort Bragg, CA mushrooms are being discussed beyond the scope of pizza toppings. Turkey tail and oyster mushrooms (pictured above) have been used in the cleaning up of oil spills, through a process called bioremediation. Bragg locals are proposing their town be the pilot study to see if these mushrooms can treat the dioxin that infests the site of a former lumber mill.

read (nytimes.com)

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by Amanda Brauer

46, 000 Estimated number of floating plastic pieces per square mile (2.6 sq km) of ocean, according to a 2006 U.N. study

source (time.com)

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by Jessica Thompson

ALERT GET RID OF THOSE PLASTIC BABY BOTTLES, is what I hear when NPR opens an interview with the following quote “Water bottles, baby bottles, and food cans, might cause cancer, early puberty, and neural and behavorial changes.” A new study and draft report by a Federal Health Agency, The National Toxicology Program, claims that a common chemical found in many plastics called B.P.A. may be altering human development, and the findings are serious and should not be dismissed. The really scary thing is when I did a search on toxicology and plastic on NPR this report was not the only one that came up. In fact there is also a link to obesity. Is it possible that while plastic has facilitated the great leap forward with medicine, it’s flip side is that the by-products are destroying our health? Touché! http://www.npr.org/search.php?text=toxicology+report+on+plasti

Average Rating: 4.8 out of 5 based on 257 user reviews.



by Kimberly B.

This is what one amazon reviewer astutely pointed out:

1.0 out of 5 stars
yum, delicious plastic, December 15, 2006
By Steve Patsy (Phoenix, AZ United States) –
Prior to buying this product from Amazon I called Braun’s customer service to inquire about the interior of this kettle. I wanted to know if the interior was made of plastic or stainless steel and if the water ever came in contact with plastic. I was told by a Braun representative that the interior to all their kettles is stainless but when my kettle arrived today the interior is plastic. So if you like the idea of water being heated in leaching plastic, then this is the product for you. On the other hand if you do not want any harmful plastic chemicals being leached into your hot water, then this is not the kettle for you.

Average Rating: 4.8 out of 5 based on 274 user reviews.



by Loid

First San Francisco banned it. Then Chicago started taxing it. Now, the city of Seattle is taking action against bottled water; last week, Mayor Greg Nickels signed an executive order to stop the city from buying bottled water. That means no more bottled water at city facilities and events, which may sound like a small step, but it’ll make a big difference; last year, the city spent $58, 000 on the stuff (and that’s not including the true cost and carbon footprint of bottled water). We’re willing to bet that the city’s taxpayers can probably think of about 58, 000 ways to better spend that money.

via (treehugger.com)

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Average Rating: 4.8 out of 5 based on 196 user reviews.



by Amanda Brauer

I just read that if everyone in LA county gave up bottled water for one year it would save 1.7 billion bottles, enough to wrap around the earth more than 1.5 times. Enough!

Average Rating: 5 out of 5 based on 221 user reviews.



by Kimberly B.

Oh, but how would I keep my bread fresh or brush my teeth without it? It’s all so confusing. I dream of a world where everything is decomposable and biodegradable and seeps back into the earth in a dark and creamy mulch. And yet how much shorter would our life-spans be were it not for those tubes sticking out of our limbs during surgery? Plastic is everywhere. It’s too many places!

Average Rating: 4.9 out of 5 based on 298 user reviews.



by Plastic In The News

by SUSAN CASEY

A vast swath of the Pacific, twice the size of Texas, is full of a plastic stew that is entering the food chain. Scientists say these toxins are causing obesity, infertility…and worse…

Plastic ocean

LONG BEACH, California (4 Nov 2007) — Fate can take strange forms, and so perhaps it does not seem unusual that Captain Charles Moore found his life’s purpose in a nightmare. Unfortunately, he was awake at the time, and 800 miles north of Hawaii in the Pacific Ocean.It happened on August 3, 1997, a lovely day, at least in the beginning: Sunny. Little wind. Water the color of sapphires. Moore and the crew of Alguita, his 50-foot aluminum-hulled catamaran, sliced through the sea.

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Average Rating: 4.6 out of 5 based on 242 user reviews.